Services

Services

High-Resolution ICP-MS

The High-Resolution ICP-MS offered by EAI is a VG AXIOM high-resolution system that is capable of providing higher sensitivities along with higher mass resolutions and with limit of detections in the parts-per-trillion and parts-per-quadrillion (ppq) ranges. The high-resolution system is especially useful for resolving troublesome interferences commonly encountered in traditional ICP-MS, with some capabilities exceeding those achievable even by reaction and collision cell technologies utilized by EAI’s quadrupole systems. The plasma ion source and sample introduction system used in High-Resolution ICP-MS are, in principal, identical to those used in the Quadrupole. It is only once the sample ions pass into the mass analyzer that we begin to see the differences between the two systems.

 

The High-Resolution mass analyzer consists of several components acting in unison. First, the ion beam passes through a narrow slit, which only vallows those ions traveling along the correct axial plane of the mass spectrometer to pass through, resulting in a narrow beam of ions all traveling parallel to each other. In the next stage, the electro static analyzer (ESA), which consists of two curved plates applied with DC voltage, causes the inner plate (negative polarity) attracts the positively charged ions, while the outer plate (positive polarity) repels the ions. The ion beam passes through the two plates and is both focused and curved through an angle of approximately 40°. Since only ions with a narrow range of kinetic energy are able to pass through the ESA, it thus forms an effective energy filter.

Introduction

After the ion beam passes through the ESA, all ions will then pass into the HR magnet, which creates a uniform magnetic field causing the passing ions to have a similar kinetic energy. The ion beam then passes through the final part of the system which is a narrow slit situated at the focal point of the magnet known as the collector slit. High resolutions are thus achieved by making both of the slits very narrow so that the beam reaching the detector has only a very narrow bandwidth of mass at any given time. Therefore, the high-resolution mass analyzer in known as a double focusing system because it is able to focus both energy and mass/charge.

Sample Types and Preparation:

ICP techniques are robust and suitable methods of trace metals analysis amenable to a wide array of sample types. Metals, plastics, proteins, soils, ceramics, and many others can be successfully analyzed using ICP methods.

 

In a typical ICP application, the sample must be placed into solution by means of an acid digestion. This type of preparation is sufficient for most sample types and constitutes a “standard” sample preparation procedure. For other sample types, such as polymers, proteins, and others, a more aggressive digestion protocol is needed and closed-vessel microwave digestion or high pressure ashing may be used.

 

For still other materials, such as aqueous solutions, a simple dilution procedure may be used for samples that will not form precipitates upon introduction of acid.

Instrument Calibration and Quality Control:

Incorporation of an external calibration series encompassing the elements to be analyzed is routine. This is designed to cover a range of concentrations that will completely bracket the concentration of analyte in the sample. In the event the sample is found to fall significantly outside the bracketed range, it can then be diluted and run again so that it falls within the desired range.

 

Internal standards can be incorporated for each sample at known concentrations for the desired element(s) to compensate for any variation in the intensity of the element signal, which can them be corrected to the known concentration. By applying this same correction to other elements in the matrix solution, the correct element concentration can then readily be calculated.

 

For potentially difficult matrices, the chemists can incorporate the use of spiked samples. This procedure involves the preparation of duplicate sample(s) spiked with each element of interest, which can then be utilized to measure the recovery efficiency of each element so that obvious discrepancies can be determined and investigate in more detail.

 

Fortified laboratory blanks, typically consisting of ultrapure water, can be run to check for instrument background. Blanks may also be spiked as a further means to ensure accuracy, analyte recovery, and instrument response.

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Location & Business Hours

Contact Us

2101 Capstone Dr Suite 110

Lexington, Ky 40511

M-F 8:30am to 5pm EST

Toll Free : 800-563-7493

Local :       859-254-5115

Fax :           859-254-5150

Copyright © 2016 Elemental Analysis, Inc.

Introduction

The High-Resolution ICP-MS offered by EAI is a VG AXIOM high-resolution system that is capable of providing higher sensitivities along with higher mass resolutions and with limit of detections in the parts-per-trillion and parts-per-quadrillion (ppq) ranges. The high-resolution system is especially useful for resolving troublesome interferences commonly encountered in traditional ICP-MS, with some capabilities exceeding those achievable even by reaction and collision cell technologies utilized by EAI’s quadrupole systems. The plasma ion source and sample introduction system used in High-Resolution ICP-MS are, in principal, identical to those used in the Quadrupole. It is only once the sample ions pass into the mass analyzer that we begin to see the differences between the two systems.

The High-Resolution mass analyzer consists of several components acting in unison. First, the ion beam passes through a narrow slit, which only vallows those ions traveling along the correct axial plane of the mass spectrometer to pass through, resulting in a narrow beam of ions all traveling parallel to each other. In the next stage, the electro static analyzer (ESA), which consists of two curved plates applied with DC voltage, causes the inner plate (negative polarity) attracts the positively charged ions, while the outer plate (positive polarity) repels the ions. The ion beam passes through the two plates and is both focused and curved through an angle of approximately 40°. Since only ions with a narrow range of kinetic energy are able to pass through the ESA, it thus forms an effective energy filter.

After the ion beam passes through the ESA, all ions will then pass into the HR magnet, which creates a uniform magnetic field causing the passing ions to have a similar kinetic energy. The ion beam then passes through the final part of the system which is a narrow slit situated at the focal point of the magnet known as the collector slit. High resolutions are thus achieved by making both of the slits very narrow so that the beam reaching the detector has only a very narrow bandwidth of mass at any given time. Therefore, the high-resolution mass analyzer in known as a double focusing system because it is able to focus both energy and mass/charge.

Sample Types and Preparation:

ICP techniques are robust and suitable methods of trace metals analysis amenable to a wide array of sample types. Metals, plastics, proteins, soils, ceramics, and many others can be successfully analyzed using ICP methods.

 

In a typical ICP application, the sample must be placed into solution by means of an acid digestion. This type of preparation is sufficient for most sample types and constitutes a “standard” sample preparation procedure. For other sample types, such as polymers, proteins, and others, a more aggressive digestion protocol is needed and closed-vessel microwave digestion or high pressure ashing may be used.

 

For still other materials, such as aqueous solutions, a simple dilution procedure may be used for samples that will not form precipitates upon introduction of acid.

Instrument Calibration and Quality Control:

Incorporation of an external calibration series encompassing the elements to be analyzed is routine. This is designed to cover a range of concentrations that will completely bracket the concentration of analyte in the sample. In the event the sample is found to fall significantly outside the bracketed range, it can then be diluted and run again so that it falls within the desired range.

 

Internal standards can be incorporated for each sample at known concentrations for the desired element(s) to compensate for any variation in the intensity of the element signal, which can them be corrected to the known concentration. By applying this same correction to other elements in the matrix solution, the correct element concentration can then readily be calculated.

 

For potentially difficult matrices, the chemists can incorporate the use of spiked samples. This procedure involves the preparation of duplicate sample(s) spiked with each element of interest, which can then be utilized to measure the recovery efficiency of each element so that obvious discrepancies can be determined and investigate in more detail.

 

Fortified laboratory blanks, typically consisting of ultrapure water, can be run to check for instrument background. Blanks may also be spiked as a further means to ensure accuracy, analyte recovery, and instrument response.

Services

High-Resolution ICP-MS

High-Resolution ICP-MS

High-Resolution ICP-MS

Services

Introduction

The High-Resolution ICP-MS offered by EAI is a VG AXIOM high-resolution system that is capable of providing higher sensitivities along with higher mass resolutions and with limit of detections in the parts-per-trillion and parts-per-quadrillion (ppq) ranges. The high-resolution system is especially useful for resolving troublesome interferences commonly encountered in traditional ICP-MS, with some capabilities exceeding those achievable even by reaction and collision cell technologies utilized by EAI’s quadrupole systems. The plasma ion source and sample introduction system used in High-Resolution ICP-MS are, in principal, identical to those used in the Quadrupole. It is only once the sample ions pass into the mass analyzer that we begin to see the differences between the two systems.

The High-Resolution mass analyzer consists of several components acting in unison. First, the ion beam passes through a narrow slit, which only allows those ions traveling along the correct axial plane of the mass spectrometer to pass through, resulting in a narrow beam of ions all traveling parallel to each other. In the next stage, the electro static analyzer (ESA), which consists of two curved plates applied with DC voltage, causes the inner plate (negative polarity) attracts the positively charged ions, while the outer plate (positive polarity) repels the ions. The ion beam passes through the two plates and is both focused and curved through an angle of approximately 40°. Since only ions with a narrow range of kinetic energy are able to pass through the ESA, it thus forms an effective energy filter.

After the ion beam passes through the ESA, all ions will then pass into the HR magnet, which creates a uniform magnetic field causing the passing ions to have a similar kinetic energy. The ion beam then passes through the final part of the system which is a narrow slit situated at the focal point of the magnet known as the collector slit. High resolutions are thus achieved by making both of the slits very narrow so that the beam reaching the detector has only a very narrow bandwidth of mass at any given time. Therefore, the high-resolution mass analyzer in known as a double focusing system because it is able to focus both energy and mass/charge.

Sample Types and Preparation:

ICP techniques are robust and suitable methods of trace metals analysis amenable to a wide array of sample types. Metals, plastics, proteins, soils, ceramics, and many others can be successfully analyzed using ICP methods.

 

In a typical ICP application, the sample must be placed into solution by means of an acid digestion. This type of preparation is sufficient for most sample types and constitutes a “standard” sample preparation procedure. For other sample types, such as polymers, proteins, and others, a more aggressive digestion protocol is needed and closed-vessel microwave digestion or high pressure ashing may be used.

 

For still other materials, such as aqueous solutions, a simple dilution procedure may be used for samples that will not form precipitates upon introduction of acid.

Instrument Calibration and Quality Control:

Incorporation of an external calibration series encompassing the elements to be analyzed is routine. This is designed to cover a range of concentrations that will completely bracket the concentration of analyte in the sample. In the event the sample is found to fall significantly outside the bracketed range, it can then be diluted and run again so that it falls within the desired range.

 

Internal standards can be incorporated for each sample at known concentrations for the desired element(s) to compensate for any variation in the intensity of the element signal, which can them be corrected to the known concentration. By applying this same correction to other elements in the matrix solution, the correct element concentration can then readily be calculated.

 

For potentially difficult matrices, the chemists can incorporate the use of spiked samples. This procedure involves the preparation of duplicate sample(s) spiked with each element of interest, which can then be utilized to measure the recovery efficiency of each element so that obvious discrepancies can be determined and investigate in more detail.

 

Fortified laboratory blanks, typically consisting of ultrapure water, can be run to check for instrument background. Blanks may also be spiked as a further means to ensure accuracy, analyte recovery, and instrument response.

 
 
 
 

Services

High-Resolution ICP-MS

The High-Resolution mass analyzer consists of several components acting in unison. First, the ion beam passes through a narrow slit, which only allows those ions traveling along the correct axial plane of the mass spectrometer to pass through, resulting in a narrow beam of ions all traveling parallel to each other. In the next stage, the electro static analyzer (ESA), which consists of two curved plates applied with DC voltage, causes the inner plate (negative polarity) attracts the positively charged ions, while the outer plate (positive polarity) repels the ions. The ion beam passes through the two plates and is both focused and curved through an angle of approximately 40°. Since only ions with a narrow range of kinetic energy are able to pass through the ESA, it thus forms an effective energy filter.

The High-Resolution mass analyzer consists of several components acting in unison. First, the ion beam passes through a narrow slit, which only allows those ions traveling along the correct axial plane of the mass spectrometer to pass through, resulting in a narrow beam of ions all traveling parallel to each other. In the next stage, the electro static analyzer (ESA), which consists of two curved plates applied with DC voltage, causes the inner plate (negative polarity) attracts the positively charged ions, while the outer plate (positive polarity) repels the ions. The ion beam passes through the two plates and is both focused and curved through an angle of approximately 40°. Since only ions with a narrow range of kinetic energy are able to pass through the ESA, it thus forms an effective energy filter.

The High-Resolution ICP-MS offered by EAI is a VG AXIOM high-resolution system that is capable of providing higher sensitivities along with higher mass resolutions and with limit of detections in the parts-per-trillion and parts-per-quadrillion (ppq) ranges. The high-resolution system is especially useful for resolving troublesome interferences commonly encountered in traditional ICP-MS, with some capabilities exceeding those achievable even by reaction and collision cell technologies utilized by EAI’s quadrupole systems. The plasma ion source and sample introduction system used in High-Resolution ICP-MS are, in principal, identical to those used in the Quadrupole. It is only once the sample ions pass into the mass analyzer that we begin to see the differences between the two systems.

The High-Resolution mass analyzer consists of several components acting in unison. First, the ion beam passes through a narrow slit, which only allows those ions traveling along the correct axial plane of the mass spectrometer to pass through, resulting in a narrow beam of ions all traveling parallel to each other. In the next stage, the electro static analyzer (ESA), which consists of two curved plates applied with DC voltage, causes the inner plate (negative polarity) attracts the positively charged ions, while the outer plate (positive polarity) repels the ions. The ion beam passes through the two plates and is both focused and curved through an angle of approximately 40°. Since only ions with a narrow range of kinetic energy are able to pass through the ESA, it thus forms an effective energy filter.